3D printer

Factors to Consider when Setting Up Your Commercial 3D Printer

Commercial 3D Printer Showroom

More people today opt to place their 3D printers in their homes. This condition begs the question– exactly how risk-free it is to place a 3D printer in an area in your home? What variables should you think about?

A 3D printer must be positioned in a room with excellent ventilation, far from a combustible product, and is not available to kids and pet dogs. Given this, it will be best to put a 3D printer in a remote workshop, generally a laundry room, garage, or pastime area. There are also various other minor factors to consider.

What to Consider when Setting Up Your Commercial 3D Printer

Contemporary 3D printers are incredibly compact. While such has been an excellent selling factor for affordable 3D printers, few people might end up underestimating the physical area a 3D printing hobby could occupy. Below are some aspects of preparing for when setting up a 3D printer.

1. Fumes

When plastic is exposed to warmth, it will often launch some fumes. Several of these fumes might be bothersome, while others might be a lot more benign (and even positive). However, you need to constantly think that breathing in like fumes is hazardous to you.

There are two means to address the problem. If you purchase a 3D printer that comes with an enclosure, it would probably have a vent arrangement with a HEPA filter. It needs to be easy to attach an elastic accordion pipe to this air vent and reroute it to an open home window or a hole in the wall.

2. Noise

Do you currently have a presumption in your head of just how loud a 3D printer is? A 3D printer is likely to be noisier than that. Considering just how huge 3D printing jobs can take 12 hours or even more to end up, positioning a 3D printer in an area where peace is needed is most likely to be a terrible act.

Therefore, we do not advise placing a 3D printer in the living room, bedroom, or any space in the house where individuals usually stay for long periods.

3. Storage area

If you do not plan for the storage area, you will likely end up with 3D printing materials intruding into your space. That 3D printer might seem little, but do not forget that you would certainly likewise be acquiring spools of filaments, bottles of material, plus a selection of various tools and materials. This will undoubtedly occupy a lot more room than the 3D printer itself.

4. Mess

There’s no other way around it– 3D printing is a hobby that could develop a lot of mess. Whether it is empty filament spindles, plastic dust, removed supports, empty resin containers, or rejected prints, you will inevitably collect scrap materials whenever you service a 3D printed job.

Keeping your commercial 3d printer in a separate room aids in maintaining the mess in one area. As much as we adore 3D printing, we should not want to see 3D printing scraps around your house.

How Can Bioprinted Bones and Organs Bring 3D Printing Australia to New Frontiers?

Much like in other countries around the globe, there is still so much room for further growth and improvement to 3D printing Australia. 

For patients who are afflicted by some kind of chronic illness, or maybe are in critical condition, the amount of time they need to spend to wait for a matching organ donor can translate to a matter of life or death. 

In the United States last year, more than 113,000 people, consisting of men, women, and children, were on the national organ transplant master list. It is sad to know, though, that the scarcity of organ donors would just continue to go and this is due to the persisting stagnation in the number of people willing to become organ donors. 

The scientific and the medical community saw the huge potential for human organ bioprinting in alleviating our dependence on human transplants. However, the working idea behind 3D printing of the human body parts, up to this day, is still considered by the very people working in the health and wellness industry as a relatively new concept. To be honest, it will take us a long while before we can set ourselves completely independent of these resources. 

Do you have an idea what could be the biggest challenge the Australian and the global medical community is faced with regarding this? 3D printed human organs and bones make use of bio-materials, and they are bio-compatible to the individual. 

In simple language, this signifies that surgeons are utilizing human cells to help them create a usable “ink” to be used in the bioprinting process. Otherwise, they will not be able to successfully build an implantable organ.

Yet, further research and study about this is still a work in progress although there have been numerous successful 3D printed organs and bones already being used by medical health professionals.  

Bioprinted Human Organs are Now In Use

The primer on 3D printed organs are 2D organs, and they are human skin. This served as a precursor to the medical space in their creation of custom skin grafts, consequently accelerating the overall procedure and thus improving the expected results.  

Implants are also taking the place of bone and cartilage, such as trachea splinters, jawbones, hip bones, and teeth. Right this very moment 3D printing is effecting revolutionary changes in the dental industry and not very long ago, in 2018, the first-ever 3D jaw bone intended for use in post-cancer reconstruction was received by an Australian woman.  

3D solution

To date, there have been over 100,000 hip bones implants that have been implanted to patients in the past few decades, and medical professionals behind these successes are optimistic that the same technology can be used for partial replacement of bones to people suffering from osteoporosis.  

Concluding Word

3D printed organs are essentially cultivated from the patient’s cells, and it will be sized to fit him. By this measure, the odds that the patient’s immune system will auto-reject the transplanted organ will be lessened. 

Theoretically speaking, there is an unlimited supply of 3D printed organs. In addition to that, we can also manufacture them in no time. This signifies that there is no more need to have a transplant waiting list. Moreover, the issue of bio-compatibility with patients that happen to have a rarer blood type will be no more. 

In the current state of things, we can’t completely ditch our transplant waiting list as of yet because we still have a long way to go in terms of research and success rate in 3D printing human organs and bones. 

But with the sustained growth and development of the 3D printing Australia industry, we might find ourselves up for some surprise that we are not too far off as we think.